A Cartoon of Mahler

Symphony No. 1 – Programmes

 

1889–94

The main information about the work’s programme(s) come from manuscript scores and the programmes/handbills for performances (English translations are given below):

 

 

1889 – Budapest

1893 – AF2 1893 – Hamburg 1894 – AF2 1894 – Weimar 1894 – Weimar
  Handbill Movement Headings Handbill Front cover Programme I Programme II

Title

Symphoniai költemény két részben

[No title page present]

„Titan”, eine Tondichtung in Symphonieform

Symphonie („Titan”) in 5 Sätzen (2 Abtheilungen)

Titan. Symphonie in zwei Abtheilungen und fünf Sätzen

Titan

[but see also the notes below]

Part I

I. rész [Part I]

 

1. Theil. „Aus den Tagen der Jugend”, Blumen-, Frucht- und Dornstücke.

 I. Theil: „Aus den Tagen der Jugend”

I. Abtheilung: «Aus den Tagen der Jugend»

I. Teil. „Aus den Tagen der Jugend”, Blumen-, Frucht- und Dornenstücke.

1

Bevezetés es [Introduction and] Allegro commodo

Nr I / „Frühling und kein Ende!”

I. „Frühling und kein Ende” (Einleitung und Allegro commodo).

Die Einleitung stellt das Erwachen der Natur aus langen Winterschlafe dar.

1. „Frühling und kein Ende”

Frühling und kein Ende

 

„Frühling und kein Ende”.

Die Einleitung schildert das Erwachen der Natur am frühesten Morgen

 

2

Andante

Nro 2

II. „Blumine” (Andante)

 2. „Blumine”

2. Blumine

2. Bluminen-Kapitel

3

Scherzo

Nro 3 „Scherzo”

III. „Mit vollen Segeln” (Scherzo)

3. „Mit vollen Segeln”

3. Mit vollen Segeln

3. Mit vollen Segeln

Part II

II. rész [Part II]

 

2. Theil. „Commedia humana”.

II. Theil: „Com[m]edia humana”

II. Abtheilung: Commedia humana

II. Teil: Commedia umana

4

A la pompes funebres; attacca

[title scratched out: illegible]

IV. „Gestrandet!” (ein Todtenmarsch in „Callot's Manier”)

Zur Erklärung dieses Satzes diene Folgendes: Die äussere Anregung zu diesem Musikstück erhielt der Autor durch das in Oesterreich allen Kindern wohlbekannte  parodistische Bild: „Des Jägers Leichenbegängniss”, aus einem alten Kindermärchenbuch: Die Thiere des Waldes geleiten den Sarg des gestorbnenen Jägers zu Grabe; Hasen tragen das Fähnlein, voran eine Capelle von böhmischen Musikanten, begeleitet von musicirenden Katzen, Unken, Krähen etc., und Hirsche, Rehe, Füchse und andere vierbeinige und gefiederte Thiere des Waldes geleiten in possirlichen Stellungen den Zug. An dieser Stelle ist dieses Stück als Ausdruck einer bald ironisch lustigen, bald unheimlich brütenden Stimmung gedacht, auf welche dann sogleich

4. Todtenmarsch in „Callots Manier”

4. Todtenmarsch in Callots Manier 

4. Des Jägers Leichenbegängnis, ein Todtenmarsch in „Callot's Manier”

Zur Erklärung diene, wenn notwendig, folgendes: Die äussere Anregung zu diesem Musikstück erhielt der Autor durch das in Süddeutschland allen Kindern wohlbekannte  parodistische Bild: „des Jägers Leichenbegängnis”, aus einem alten Kindermärchenbuch: Die Tiere des Waldes geleiten den Sarg des verstorbnenen Försters zu Grabe; Hasen tragen das Fähnlein, voran eine Kapelle von böhmischen Musikanten, begeleitet von musizierenden Katzen, Unken, Krähen usw., und Hirsche, Rehe, Füchse und andere vierbeinige und gefiederte Tiere des Waldes geleiten in possierlichen Stellungen den Zug. An dieser Stelle ist dieses Stück als Ausdruck einer bald ironisch lustigen, bald unheimlich brütenden Stimmung gedacht, auf welche dann sogleich

5

Molto appassionato

Dal Inferno al Paradiso Nro 5 [deleted]

V. „Dall’ Inferno” (Allegro furioso)

folgt, als der plötzliche Ausbruch der Verzweiflung eines im Tiefsten verwundeten Herzens

5. „D'all Inferno al Paradiso”

V. Dell Inferno al Paradiso

Dall'inferno al Paradiso (Allegro furioso) folgt, als der plötzliche Ausbruch der Verzweiflung eines im Tiefsten verwundeten Herzens."

             
 

English Translations

Title

Symphonic Poem in two parts

[No title page present

Titan’, a tone poem in the form of a symphony

Symphony (Titan) in 5 Movements (2 Parts)

Symphony (Titan) in two parts and five movements

Titan

 [but see also the notes below]

Part I

Part 1

 

Part I. ‘From the days of Youth’, Flower-, Fruit- and Thorn-pieces.

 I. Part: From the Days of
Youth

 I. Part: From the Days of
Youth

Part I. ‘From the days of Youth’, Flower-, Fruit- and Thorn-pieces.

1

Introduction and Allegro commodo

No. 1 / Spring without end!”

I. ‘Spring without end’

(Introduction and Allegro comodo).

The introduction depicts Nature's awakening from the long sleep of Winter.

1. Spring without end

1. Spring without end

I. ‘Spring without end’

The introduction depicts Nature's awakening in the early morning

 

2

Andante

No. 2

II. Blumine’ (Andante)

 2. Blumine

 2. Blumine

2. Blumine Chapter

3

Scherzo

No. 3 Scherzo

III. ‘In full sail’ (Scherzo)

3. In full Sail

3. In full Sail

3. In full Sail

Part II

Part II

 

Part 2. ‘Commedia humana’.

II. Part: The Human Comedy

II. Part: The Human Comedy

II. Part: The Human Comedy

4

In the style of funeral obsequies; attacca [title scratched out: illegible]

IV. ‘Aground!’ (a funeral march in Callot's Manier’

The following may serve as an explanation of this movement: the external stimulus for this piece of music came to the author from the parodistic picture, known to all children in Austria, ‘The Hunter's Funeral’ from an old book of children's fairy tales: the beasts of the forest accompany the dead hunter's coffin to the grave; hares carrying a small banner, with a band of Bohemian musicians, in front, and the procession escorted by music-making cats, toads, crows, etc., with stags, roes, foxes and other four-legged and feathered creatures of the forest in comic postures. At this point the piece is conceived as the expression of a mood now ironically merry, now weirdly brooding, which is the promptly followed by

4. Funeral March in Callot's manner

4. Funeral March in Callot's manner

IV. The Hunter's Funeral, a funeral march after Callot.

If one is needed, the following may serve as an explanation of this movement: the external stimulus for this piece of music came to the author from the parodistic picture, known to all children in southern Germany, ‘The Hunter's Funeral’ from an old book of children's fairy tales. The forest animals accompany the dead hunter's coffin to the grave; hares carry the banner, with a band of Bohemian musicians, in front, accompanied by cats, toads, crows, etc., making music, and red deer, roe deer, foxes and other four-legged and feathered animals of the forest in mocking poses lead the procession. Here the piece is conceived as the expression of a mood now ironically merry, now weirdly brooding, which is the promptly followed by

5

Molto appassionato From the Inferno to Paradise No. 5 [deleted]

V. „Dall’ Inferno” (Allegro furioso)

the sudden eruption of a heart wounded to the quick.

5. From the Inferno to Paradise

5. From the Inferno to Paradise

„Dall’ Inferno” (Allegro furioso),

the sudden eruption of a heart wounded to the quick.

      [English translation from DM2, 157:]      

Although the handbill for the 1889 première has only a single programmatic hint – the description of the fourth movement – it is clear that at least one Budapest journalist, Kornél Ábrányi, was briefed with information about the work; on 19 November 1889 (the day of the dress rehearsal) he published a preview of the work in the Pester Lloyd, summarized by Henry-Louis de La Grange (HLG1, 203 & 746; HLG1F, 307 & 965):

The “Symphonic Poem” might be called Life, illustrating as it does the life of one “who sees, who feels, who experiences, that life which throws earth's marvels into the paths of youth” and which, with “the first breath of autumn, takes back pitilessly everything that has been given earlier.”
In the first part, the rosy clouds of youth and the feeling of spring; in the second, happy daydreams, in the third a joyful wedding procession. But these fade away and, in the fourth, tragedy appears without warning. The funeral march represents the burial of all of the poet's illusions, inspired by the well-known “Hunter's Funeral.” This bold, powerfully conceived movement is made up of two contrasting moods. The final section brings to man redemption and resignation, harmony of life, work and faith. Beaten to the ground, he rises again and wins the final victory. This philosophic resignation imposes its eternal verities and its conciliating harmony upon the end of the work.

This glimpse into the composer's thinking did not inhibit Ábrányi from writing a scathing review (see ZRGMH, 80–1).

The history of the two 'programmes' issued in connection with the Weimar performance in 1894 is complex, and not unambiguously documented. Knud Martner offers a brief outline of events (Martner2 , p. 97):

...the program booklet [of the Tonkünstler-Versammlung of the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein] omits the descriptive programs, but retains the titles of the individual movements [= programme I above], which were identical with those in the autograph score kept at Yale University, New Haven (Osborn Collection) [i.e. AF2]. This was apparently done without Mahler's approval, because on the day of the concert a new program was printed on a separate paper and distributed, which – with some modifications – is identical with the Hamburg program....Unfortunately a copy of this additional "Weimar program" has not been located.

The fact that a revised programme was issued at the last moment was recorded in 1902 by one of the members of the Weimar audience, the critic Ernst Otto Nodnagel (EONJ, p. 7–8 (see Fig. 1 below)), who also included what appears to be a transcription of the revised version (Weimar Programme II above). He gives no indication that he had access to or knowledge of the 1893 Hamburg programme, so it may be assumed that his version is uncontaminated by readings from that earlier version. On the other hand, a truncated version of the revised Weimar programme (within a transcription that incompletely and inconsistently presents it and the Hamburg version) provided by Paul Stefan in 1910 (PSGM1, 86) suggests that Nodnagel may have inadvertently omitted tempo and genre designations for the first three movements. Neither Specht nor Nodnagel include a generic subtitle for the whole work (as had been the case in the Hamburg programme and the first Weimar programme).

1891

In the autumn of 1891 Mahler wrote to the conductor G.F. Kogel to try to interest him in performing a symphonic poem in two parts entitled “Aus dem Leben eines Einsamen”.

1896

All programmatic titles and headings were omitted for the 1896 Berlin performance, after which the work was invariably heard (and published) as the Symphony [No. 1] in D major.

Nevertheless, in private Mahler was not unwilling to discuss the work in in programmatic terms and in a letter to the composer and critic Max Marschalk dated 20 March 1896 he described the last two movements in terms that are clearly related to the Hamburg and Weimar programmes (GMB, 185–6; GMSL, 177–8):

Mit dem Titel(„ Titan") und dem Programm hat es seine Richtigkeit; d.h. seinerzeit bewogen mich meine Freunde, um das Verständnis der D-dur zu erleichtern, eine Art Programm hierzu zu liefern. Ich hatte also nachträglich mir diese Titel und Erklärungen ausgesonnen. Daß ich sie diesmal wegließ, hat nicht nur darin seinen Grund, daß ich sie dadurch für durchaus nicht erschöpfend – ja nicht einmal zutreffend charakterisiert glaube, sondern, weil ich es erlebt habe, auf welch falsche Wege hierdurch das Publikum geriet....

You are right about the title (Titan) and the programme. At the time my friends persuaded me to write some sort of programme notes to make the D major easier to understand. So I worked out the title and these explanatory notes retrospectively. My reason for omitting them this time was not only that I thought them quite inadequate – in fact, not even accurate or relevant – but that I have experienced the way the audiences have been set on the wrong track by them....

Beim dritten Satz (marcia funebre) verhält es sich allerdings so, daß ich die äußere Anregung dazu durch das bekannte Kinderbild erhielt („Des Jägers Leichenbegängnis"). – An dieser Stelle ist es aber irrelevant, was dargestellt wird – es kommt nur auf die Stimmungen, welche zum Ausdruck gebracht werden soll, und aus der dann jäh, wie der Blitz aus der dunklen Wolke, der vierte Satz springt. Es ist einfach der Aufschrei eines im Tiefsten verwundeten Herzens, dem eben die unheimlich und ironisch brütende Schwüle des Trauermarsches vorhergeht. Ironisch im Sinne des Aristoteles „eironeia“. –

As regards the third movement (‘Marcia funebre’), I must admit that my inspiration came from the well-known nursery-picture (The Burial of the Huntsman). — But at this point in the work it is irrelevant – what matters is only the mood that has to be expressed, the mood from which the fourth movement then suddenly flashes like lightning out of a thundercloud. It is simply the outcry of a heart deeply wounded, a cry preceded by the uncannily and ironically brooding sultriness of the funeral march. ‘Ironic’ in the sense of the Aristotelian eironeia.–

1900

In the section entitled Spieljahr 1900/1901 of her posthumously published memoirs of Mahler Natalie Bauer-Lechner published an account of various aspects of his First Symphony derived from her conversations with the composer after rehearsals for the Viennese première; the programmatic outline presumably reflected his current thinking about the work. This passage was somewhat abbreviated by J. Killian, the editor of the first edition: the extract below is from the 1984 edition, which follows Bauer-Lechner's original manuscript (the passages in [  ] were omitted in the first edition; see NBL, 148–9; NBL2, 173–5; NBLE, 157–8 (revised and supplemented below):

[Mahler war, wie immer, wenn er etwas aufführte, bewegt und ganz voll davon, und auf unseren Spaziergängen nach den Proben schwärmten und ergingen wir uns in endlosem Geplauder über Vergangenes, Gegenwärtiges und Zukünftiges dieses'Werks. Was ich dabei von Mahler erfuhr, faßte ich in einem Briefe an Karpath zusammen, dem das Folgende entnommen ist.]

[As always when he performed something, Mahler was moved and full of it, and on our walks after the rehearsals we enthused and indulged in endless chatting about the past, present and future of this work. What I learnt from him I summarized in a letter to [Ludwig] Karpath, from which the following is extracted.]

Mahler hatte seine Erste ursprünglich „Titan“ genannt, dann aber diesen Titel, wie alle Überschriften seiner Werke, längst gestrichen, weil sie ihm als Andeutungen eines Programms ausgelegt und mißdeutet wurden. So brachte man ihm seinen „Titan“ mit dem Jean Paul'schen in Verbindung. Er hatte aber einfach einen kraftvoll-heldenhaften Menschen im Sinne, sein Leben und Leiden, Ringen und Unterliegen gegen das Geschick, „wozu die wahre, höhere Auflösung erst die Zweite bringt“.

Originally, Mahler had called his First Symphony ‘Titan’. But he has long ago eradicated this title, and all other superscriptions of his works, because he found that people misinterpreted them as indications of a programme. For instance, they connected his ‘Titan’ with Jean Paul’. But all he had in mind was a powerfully heroic individual, his life and suffering, struggles and defeat at the hands of fate. ‘The true, higher redemption comes only in the Second Symphony.’

Im ersten Satz reißt uns eine dionysische, noch durch nichts gebrochene und getrübte Jubelstimmung mit sich fort. Mit dem ersten Ton, dem langausgehaltenen Flageolett-A, sind wir mitten in der Natur: im Walde, wo das Sonnenlicht des sommerlichen Tages durch die Zweige zittert und flimmert. „Den Schluß dieses Satzes“, sagte Mahler, „werden mir die Hörer gewiß nicht auffassen; er wird abfallen, während ich ihn leicht wirksamer hätte gestalten können. Mein Held schlägt eine Lache auf und läuft davon. Das Thema, welches die Pauke zuletzt hat, findet gewiß keiner heraus! – Im zweiten Satz treibt sich der Jüngling schon kräftiger, derber und lebenstüchtiger in der Welt herum.“

In the first movement, we are carried away by a dionysian mood of jubilation, as yet completely unbroken and untroubled. With the first note, the long-sustained A in harmonics, we are in the midst of Nature: in the forest, where the sunshine of the summer day quivers and glimmers through the branches. ‘The end of this movement’ said Mahler ‘will certainly not be understood by the audience; it will fall flat, though I could easily have made it more effective. My hero bursts into a roar of laughter and runs away. Certainly no one will ever discover the theme which the kettledrum plays at the end!’ In the second movement, the young man is getting around in the world much more vigorously, sturdily and competently.’

Der wundervolle Tanzrhythmus des Trios. ist besonders zu beachten, „denn vom Tanz geht alle Musik aus“, wie Mahler einmal sagte. „Da werden mich alle wegen der zwei Anfangstakte, bei denen mich das Gedächtnis verließ und die an eine in Wien sehr bekannte Symphonie Bruckners erinnern, als Dieb und unoriginellen Menschen verschreien!“

Mahler hat übrigens den Anfang für diese Aufführung im letzten Augenblick etwas variiert.)

The wonderful dance-rhythm of the Trio is worthy of special notice, for, as Mahler once said, ‘all music proceeds from the dance’. ‘Everyone will accuse me of plagiarism and of lacking originality because of the two opening bars, in which I lost my memory and inadvertently quoted a Bruckner symphony which is very well-known in Vienna!’

(Actually, at the last moment Mahler slightly altered the opening for the performance.)

Hieran schloß sich ursprünglich ein sentimental-schwärmerischer Satz, die Liebesepisode – von Mahler scherzhaft auch die „Jugend-Eselei“ seines Helden genannt –, den er dann entfernte.

Following this, there was originally a sentimentally indulgent  movement, the love episode - which Mahler jokingly called the ‘youthful folly’ of his hero. Later, he removed it.

Als Dritter der „Bruder Martin“-Satz, der am meisten mißverstanden und geschmäht wurde. Mahler sprach neulich davon: „Jetzt hat er (mein Held) schon ein Haar in der Suppe gefunden und die Mahlzeit ist ihm verdorben.“ Auch sagte er, schon als Kind sei ihm der „Bruder Martin“ nicht heiter, wie er immer gesungen wurde, sondern tief tragisch erschienen, und er hörte schon das heraus, was sich ihm später daraus entwickelte. – Übrigens fiel ihm beim Komponieren zuerst der zweite Teil dieses Satzes ein und erst darnach, als er den Anfang dazu suchte, tönte ihm fortwährend der Kanon „Bruder Martin" im Ohr über dem Orgelpunkt, den er brauchte, bis er, keck entschlossen, ihn ergriffe.

The third movement is the ‘Bruder Martin’ piece which was more misunderstood and scorned than all the rest of the work. Mahler recently described it this way: ‘By now he (my hero) has already found a hair in the soup and it has spoiled his appetite.’ He also said that even as a child he had never thought of ‘Bruder Martin’ as cheerful – the way it is always sung – but rather profoundly tragic. Even then, he could hear in it what he developed from it later. Actually, when he was composing it, the second part of this movement had occurred to him first. Only later, when he was looking for a beginning, was he continually haunted by the canon ‘Bruder Martin’ over the pedal-point which he needed – until at last he boldly resolved to adopt it.

[Äußerlich mag man sich den Vorgang hier etwa so vorstellen: An unserem Helden zieht ein Leichenbegängnis vorbei und das ganze Elend, der ganze Jammer der Welt mit ihren schneidenden Kontrasten und der gräßlichen Ironie faßt ihn an. Den Trauermarsch des „Bruder Martin" hat man sich von einer ganz schlechten Musikkapelle, wie sie solchen Leichenbegängnissen zu folgen pflegen, dumpf abgespielt zu denken. Dazwischen tönt die ganze Roheit, Lustigkeit und Banalität der Welt in den Klängen irgend einer sich dreinmischenden „böhmischen Musikantenkapelle" hinein, zugleich die furchtbar schmerzliche Klage des Helden. Es wirkt erschütternd in seiner scharfen Ironie und rücksichtslosen Polyphonie, besonders wo wir – nach dem Zwischensatz – den Zug vom Begräbnis zurückkommen sehen und die Leichenmusik die übliche (hier durch Mark und Bein gehende) „lustige Weise" anstimmt.

[You might also picture what happens in it in some such way as this: Our hero watches a funeral procession draw past him, and all the misery, the sum of the world's sorrow, possesses him with its sharp contrasts and hideous irony. The ‘Bruder Martin’ funeral march one has to think of as being mechanically sight-read by a completely wretched ensemble of the sort that plays at such funerals. This is periodically interrupted by all the crudity, frivolity and banality of the world in the sounds of some sort of motley ‘bohemian players’ band, at the same time as the terribly painful lamentation of the hero. With its keen irony and relentless polyphony it is unnerving, particularly where, following the wonderful middle section, we see the procession returning after the burial, and where the funeral-players intone the customary ‘merry tune’ (here cutting to the quick).

Mit einem entsetzlichen Aufschrei beginnt, ohne Unterbrechung an den vorigen anschließend, der letzte Satz, in dem wir nun unseren Heros völlig preisgeben, mit allem Leid dieser Welt im furchtbarsten Kampfe sehen. „Immer wieder bekommt er – und das sieghafte Motiv mit ihm – eins auf den Kopf vom Schicksal", wenn er sich darüber zu erheben und seiner Herr zu werden scheint, und erst im Tode – da er sich selbst besiegt hat und der wundervolle Anklang an seine Jugend mit dem Thema des ersten Satzes wieder auftaucht – erringt er den Sieg. (Herrlicher Siegeschoral!)]

With no pause following the previous movement, a horrifying scream opens the final movement, in which we now see our hero altogether abandoned, with all the sorrows of this world, to the most terrible of battles. Again and again he gets knocked on the head (and the triumph-motive with him) by Fate whenever he appears to pull himself out of it and become its master, and only in death –  after he has overcome himself and the wonderful reminiscence of his earliest youth has brought back with it the themes of the first movement – does he achieve the victory (magnificent victory-chorale!).]

The letter to which Bauer-Lechner refers was written on 16 November 1900 and has been transcribed and translated into English (NBLE, 236–41).

 


 

Facsimile of Ernst Otto Nodnagel, Jenseits von Wagner und Liszt, p. 7

Facsimile of Ernst Otto Nodnagel, Jenseits von Wagner und Liszt, p. 8

Fig. 1

Ernst Otto Nodnagel, Jenseits von Wagner und Liszt: Profile und Perspektiven

(Königsburg: Ostpreßischer Druckerei und Verlagsanstalt A.G., 1902)

pp. 7–8

Level A conformance icon, 
          W3C-WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0Creative Commons Licence

© 2007-14 Paul Banks | This page was last edited on 20 January 2018