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Main heading: The Music of Gustav Mahler: A Catalogue of Manuscript and Printed Sources [rule] Paul Banks

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Index to this page

 

Title

 

Date

 

Movements

 

Dedication

 

Texts

 

Scoring

 

Duration

 

Manuscripts

 

Printed editions

 

Performance History

 

Chronology

 

Notes

 
 

Dedication

 
 

Related Work

 
 

Critical Edition

 

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Lieder für Tenorstimme

 

Title

  5 Lieder für Tenorstimme

Date

  Im Lenz: 19 Februar 1880; Winterlied: 27 Februar 1880; Maitanz im Grünen: 5 März 1880

Movements

  Im Lenz
  Winterlied
  Maitanz im Grünen

Dedication

  Josephinen zueiggnet

Texts

  The manuscript contains no attributions for the texts, which were probably by the composer

Scoring

  Tenor and Piano

Duration

  Im Lenz: c. 2:30; Winterlied: c. 3:20; Maitanz im Grünen: c. 2:20

Manuscripts

  Autograph fair copy (CDN-Lu Mahler-Rosé Collection, OS-MD-684)

Printed Editions

  First published in SWXIII/5 (1990; see below)
Performance history
 

The first confirmed performance of the three completed songs appears to have been broadcast in Radio Brünn on 30 September 1934; they were sung by Zdeněk Knittl, accompanied by Alfred Rosé (DM1, 119).

Chronology
 
1880.02.19 ‘Im Lenz’ completed
1880.02.27 ‘Winterlied’ completed

1880.03.05

‘Maitanz im Grünen’ completed

1880.03.18 Mahler may have sent copies of the three completed songs to Josephine Poisl in anticipation of the first day of Spring (21 March) (GMNUB, 59)

1880.03.21

Short score of Der Spielmann (incorporating part of ‘Im Lenz’) completed

1886.04.19 A revised version of ‘Maitanz im Grünen’ performed as ‘Hans und Grete’ in Prague

1888

Motives from ‘Maitanz im Grünen’ incorporated into the scherzo of the First Symphony

1892

‘Hans und Grete’ published by Schott in volume 1 of the Lieder und Gesänge

Notes

 

Dedication

The dedicatee of these songs - named simply ‘Josephine' on the title page - was first identified in 1921 in an article by Dr Rudolf Stephan Hoffmann (RSHUJM). As he makes clear, he was given access to the manuscript of the collection by its owner, Frau Justine Rosé, Mahler's sister, and appears that in thanks for this he sent her a proof copy of the article (CDN-Lu Mahler-Rose Collection OS-MD-698).  It was presumably Justine who provided the little information he was able to divulge about 'Josephine':

[Die drei Lieder] verdankt ihr Enstehen einer Jugendleidenschaft für die, der die Widmung galt. Es war ein Fräulein Josephine Poisl, von der ich nichts weiter weiß, als daß sie die Tochter des Beamten, der damals in Iglau dem Postamt vorstand, daß sie später geheiratet hat, und „schon lang in der Ferne weilt”, aus der es keine Wiederkeht gibt. 

The three songs owe their existence to a youthful passion for the recipient of the dedication. This was a Miss Josephine Poisl, of who I know nothing beyond the fact that she was the daughter of an official who at that time worked at the Post Office in Iglau, that she later married, and 'for some time has wandered in the distance place', from which there is no return.

For Mahler, at least, the love affair was serious and he kept a collection of letters and other documents connected with it for the rest of his life. He had taught the sisters Josefa and Anna Poisl piano in the summer of 1879, and from this his infatuation grew. However, Frl. Poisl's father did not consider Mahler a suitable suitor for his daughter, and in June wrote to Mahler forbidding him to write to her. Shortly afterwards she married Julius Wallner, a teacher twenty years her senior who eventually became director of the local College (GMNUB, 52–65 (this includes an extended introduction and transcriptions of Mahler's correspondence with the Poisl family; HLG1, 62–7). Franz Willnauer's suggestion that the Frühlingsboten (Spring greetings) that Mahler tells Josephine he is sending her in a letter dated 18 March 1880, were in fact the three completed songs in the collection, is not implausible. However, was this gift the sole surviving manuscript? If so, how did it end up in Justine's possession? If not, then there must have been another autograph manuscript. If so, did it include two further songs that completed the set?

 

Vocal Range

Taken together the songs demand a tenor with a wide compass: (at sounding pitch) from A ('Maitanz im Grünen') to b' ('Winterlied') or c' if the ossia is taken in 'Im Lenz'.

 

Related Work

‘Im Lenz’ shares an extended passage with Das klagende Lied. The section in question, bb. 14–26 of the song, makes its first appearance (a fifth lower in pitch) in bb. 302–14 of Der Spielmann, part two of the original three-movement version of the cantata. The autograph short score of this movement is dated 21 March 1880, so it seems likely that the passage was first conceived in the context of the song.

The last completed song, 'Maitanz im Grünen', was subsequently transposed upwards and revised to eventually become 'Hans und Grete', the third song in volume I of the Lieder und Gesänge, published in 1892. Because the original song had an usually wide vocal range – A-a' (sounding pitch) – Mahler had to modify the higher passages when transposing the song.

 

Critical Edition

SWXIII/5: Gustav Mahler, Verscheidene Lieder für eine Singstimme mit Klavier, Sämtliche Werke, Kritische Gesamtausgabe, Band XIII Teilband 5, ed. Zoltan Roman ([S.l.]: Schott, 1990)

   
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© 2007-14 Paul Banks  |  This page was lasted edited on 14 December 2017